OMG! Purpose of the Blue Part of an Eraser Explained ►

OMG! Purpose of the Blue Part of an Eraser Explained

blue part

Very few school children have a pencil sheet with a full set of writing, but everyone knows what a typical rubber looks like. It consists of hard and soft parts of different colors. And for some reason, we tend to think that the blue part, which scratches the paper hard, is designed to erase pen marks.

This myth has been etched in our memory and no one has ever explained to us why the rubber is designed to be this way, as a small hard part leaves a hole in your bookcase with just a few rubles. Now, why do we need it at all?

Turns out it’s not an engineer’s fault and their first impression was that the eraser should have removed only the pencil marks. The hard part should have been used on heavy grades of paper such as shiny art paper, where pencil marks are difficult to remove. And here we were thinking that this is all a scam and a writing factory trying to help children find a way around the school ban on removing pen marks (for example, your grade can be greatly reduced for dirty writing).

Apparently, the Blue Part was never meant to erase pen marks

When our elders told us that the blue end could help us to correct the mistakes we had made with our pens, it stimulated our little ignorant minds. We all tried and failed, sadly.

We were confused about the whole problem but finally got the full answer to the question –

The blue end is intended to erase pencil marks from heavy paper marks or black marks.

The soft (pink/orange) finish is applied to small strips of paper with a hard-coated side that can be cracked, as well as precision wiping, such as removing a light mark between dark markers.

On shiny art paper, pencil marks are painkillers that need to be removed. The blue finish is hard and does not fade with use in a bright paper form. We have always believed that the red part is the erase of writing, and the blue part is the erasing of paper. But after this revelation, we thought we had finally solved the mystery that had plagued our innocent childhood. Then we came across something that disturbed our brain.

I am one hundred percent sure that we are all told that the blue side of the ink eraser. Our senseless childhood minds have finally tried that but failed miserably because the blue part is not intended to lubricate the ink, you will be amazed.

Blue part

Most of us have used erasers without asking how it really works. According to Wikipedia, the erasers were invented in 1770 by Edward Naime of England. Before that, people used white bread to roll.

From there erased erasers made of rubber. The normal eraser changes and is still difficult to break. Here’s why this happened.

Erasers are mainly made of rubber from trees mixed with complex organic molecules such as vinyl or fine pumice. It is also mixed with sulfur and heated to strengthen it, a process called vulcanization.

Vegetable oil is also mixed with rubber used to soften it a little. Now, back to our main topic. The blue side is designed to wipe black marks or to paint pencil marks on heavy paper.

The orange part should erase the bright marks on the light paper. When you rub the mark some heat is created. The heat makes the rubber sticky enough to pull the graphite pencil pieces from the paper. That is why there are small pieces of rubber left on the paper after applying the rubber to it.

Purpose of the Blue Part of an Eraser Explained

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Purpose of the Blue Part of an Eraser Explained
Article Name
Purpose of the Blue Part of an Eraser Explained
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Apparently, the Blue Part was never meant to erase pen marks, The blue end is intended to erase pencil marks from heavy paper marks or black marks.
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Nairobinewsnow.com

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3 Comments

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